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Success in the 21st Century - Gender differences?

If you speak to successful people, there are those who tell you:
  • they had a plan from day one  (organised)
  • they were just in the right place at the right time (lucky)
  • they worked hard and were recognised (dedicated)
  • they continued to grow their skill set (life long learning)
  • they saw an opportunity and grabbed it (opportunistic) and
  • they are well connected (networkers)
All work individually, and, in combination, could make you unstoppable.   Of course, there are other factors, too - the economy, changing business requirements, to mention just two.
And then you have to define success.
Every person I speak to has a different definition, so for the purposes of this little article, I have tied it down to a few key areas that matter to me:
  • Having a fulfilling purpose
  • Having choices
  • Financial independence
  • Successful integration of work and home
It is important to note that I have made the decision to no longer talk about work/life balance because it has been pointed out to me (thank you, Mr Adrian Schofield) that work is life, too.   So it is now work (or office) and home.
While we used to define success as high status and financial riches, it is very clear that the traditional male concept is undergoing a metamorphosis.   Women and the millennials see success in achieving family and business goals.
Being able to work and play in a time choice way are also key success factors.   It’s not about working less, but working when…
Reading the Spark Business IQ report on work/life balance (I know) for small business, it does appear that men are better at setting the boundaries in many ways, but raises the question that this might be because their financial situation enables this.
69% of women in this survey cited the right balance as success, as opposed to 58% of men.
So, yes, there are differences, but not opposite ends of the spectrum.  It appears, that the millenials of both genders are coming down more on side of  work needing to be aligned with a full life plan.
I was lucky enough to hear Cheryl Carolus speak at a conference where she asked the audience “When is it enough?”    It was an inspiring speech to a mainly female audience, asking them to be ambitious without being dissatisfied.
This is the crux for me, recognising and appreciating what you do have, while continuing to strive to grow and achieve your own objectives and goals.
And some of those goals definitely need to be of the bucket list variety.
So rejoice in every success, at work we ring a bell for every sale, start each meeting with success stories, and at home we celebrate with great food and wine…
Links, References and Notes
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheryl_Carolus
https://sparkbusinessiq.com/article/how-do-paths-to-success-for-small-business-owners-differ-by-gender-infographic/

Note

Thank you for reading Teryl@Work.   Should you wish to use any of the material, please acknowledge this blog as the source.


email:      tschroenn@accsys.co.za
twitter:   @TerylSchroenn

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